2013 Top Corporate Sponsors
  Sea Turtle Sponsors - $5,000+ 
ADCNR State Lands Coastal Section
Alabama PALS
Bebo's
Mobile Bay NEP
ExxonMobil
   
 
Dune Sponsors - $2,000+
Alabama Power
Alabama Department of Transportation
ALFA
Alabama Farmer's Co-Op
City of Gulf Shores
Vulcan Materials Company  
Honda Manufacturing of Alabama
LuLu's
Ike's Beach Service
City of Orange Beach
The Original Oyster House
Alabama State Port Authority








 

 

26th ANNUAL ALABAMA COASTAL CLEANUP DEBRIS HISTORY

 

The Alabama Coastal Cleanup is part of an international effort to remove marine debris from coastal waters. Alabama joined this effort in 1987. Since then more than 68,583 volunteers in Alabama have removed a total of 1,420,466 pounds of debris and cleaned 4,582 miles of coast. The International Coastal Cleanup (ICC) is the largest single-day volunteer event for the marine environment. Part of this unique experience is data collection. After years of collecting data on the specific types of marine debris being found, ICC data now focuses on the activities that cause the debris. The Ocean Conservancy compiles, analyzes, and tracks this data year-by-year and site-to-site to identify the activities and general sources of the debris in a region, state, or country.

Activities That Produce Marine Debris

Recreational and Shoreline Activities: Debris from beachgoers, picnics, sports and games, festivals, as well as litter washed from streets, parking lots, and storm drains.

Ocean/Waterway Activities: Debris from recreational fishing and boating; commercial fishing; cargo, military, and cruise ships; and offshore industries such as oil drilling.

Smoking Related Activities: The littering of cigarette filters, cigar tips, and tobacco products packaging is common on land and sea.

Dumping Activities: Debris from legal and illegal dumping of building material or large household items.

Medical/Personal Hygiene: This debris can be left by beachgoers as well as disposed of improperly into toilets and city streets. Because medical and hygiene debris often enters the waste stream through sewer systems, its presence on the beach can indicate the presence of other, unseen pollutants.

Runoff: Trash left anywhere on land may reach streams and creeks during rainfall events. Those tributaries flow into local waterways carrying the trash with them.

Source: The Ocean Conservancy, Virginia Beach, VA "2003 International Coastal Cleanup, Alabama Summery Report," pg. 8

ALABAMA MONOFILAMENT RECOVERY AND RECYCLING INITIATIVE

Alabama Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources
State Lands Division, Coastal Section

If you haven't seen them already, look for the white PVC pipes at your local fishing hole along the coast and fill them with your used and broken fishing line. These outdoor bins are made of 4- or 6-inch PVC, and may be labeled with a variety of stickers including "We recycle. Don't leave your line behind" and "Monofilament Recovery and Recycling." Please pay special attention to the "Warning: No Garbage" sticker. Plus, coming soon to your coastal tackle shops will be cardboard indoor bins, in which you can drop off your line as well as your empty spools.

Why should you recycle your monofilament? Because discarded monofilament takes over 600 years before it will begin to biodegrade. During those 600 years, monofilament can entangle or be ingested by fish, sea turtles, birds, marine mammals, and other wildlife. Monofilament can also become entangled in boat propellers causing costly damage to motors, and it can trap SCUBA divers and swimmers as well. Even when you throw your line in a garbage can there is a risk that it will ensnare other wildlife or wash its way back to the water.

If you have any questions about the program or would like to become a partner, please contact Angela Underwood at (251) 928-9792 or angela.underwood@dcnr.alabama.gov. If you would like to volunteer for the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Initiative or participate in a local coastal cleanup, please contact Mark Langner of the Southeastern Wildlife Conservation Group at (205) 243-4755 or mark.langner@swcgroup.org. Partners in the Alabama Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Initiative are: Southeastern Wildlife Conservation Group, Auburn University Marine Extension and Research Center, Alabama State Lands Division-Coastal Section, Alabama Marine Resources Division, Alabama Department of Environmental Management, Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant, and the Alabama Gulf Coast Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Recycle Your Line Here:

 

Baldwin County
Indoor Bins:
Gulf Shores Marine Resources Office

Outdoor Bins:
Boggy Point Ramp
Cotton Bayou Ramp
Fort Morgan Ramp
Canal Park Ramp
Week's Bay
Big Bob's
Scott's Landing
Alabama Point (4 bins)
Lake Shelby Gulf State Park (5 bins)
Sportsman's Marina
Mobile County
Indoor Bins:
Dauphin Island Marine Resources Office
Southern Bama Shop

Outdoor Bins:
Dauphin Island Pier
Dauphin Island Campground
Dauphin Island East End Pier
Little Billy Goat Hole Ramp
Billy Goat Hole Ramp
Dauphin Island Marina
River Delta Marina
Helen Wood Park
 
Copyright © 2013 Alabama Coastal Cleanup, Inc. All Rights Reserved.